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Red Iron Oxide Analyze

Fe2O3 85% Min S.G 4.7 Min Moisture 0.1 Max Mesh 200 Water Soluble Solids 0.1% Max Packing 25kg. 5ply paper bags

What is Red Iron Oxide?

Hematite is an important ore of iron and it's blood red color (in the powdered form) lends itself well in use as a pigment. Hematite gets its name from a Greek word meaning blood-like because of the color of its powder. Ancient superstition held that large deposits of hematite formed from battles that were fought and the subsequent blood that flowed into the ground. Crystals of Hematite are considered rare and are sought after by collectors as are fine Kidney Ore specimens. Hematite is the most important source of iron ore in the world. The production of iron has been important to nations of the world for over 2500 years. Today the addition of other minerals to iron has lead to the production of steel which is vital to the economy of the major countries on Earth. Hematite has a red or black color but the streak is always red. The iron in the hematite turns red when it comes in contact with water and oxygen. In other words this rock is rusted!!

“What is the difference between Natural and Synthetic Iron Oxides?”

“What is the difference between Natural and Synthetic Iron Oxides?” Three different iron oxide mineral normally is the foundation for all Iron Oxide Pigments. These minerals are as below: 1) Hematite (Red Iron Oxide) 2) Magnetite (Black Iron Oxide) 3) Goethite (Yellow Iron Oxide) These minerals can be produced naturally by geologic activities or can be synthetically produced in chemical reactions. The color of the iron oxide is determined by the size of the individual mineral crystals. Reds - Small Particle/Yellow Cast - Large Particle/Blue Cast Yellows - Small Particle/Green Cast - Large Particle/Red Cast Blacks - Small Particle/Brown Cast - Large Particle/Blue Cast While the mineral iron oxide in both “Naturals” and “Synthetics” is similar, Natural Iron Oxide contains contaminants which often reduce their color strength in comparison with their Synthetic ones. These contaminants include two types: those with coloring features and some that act as an extender. The coloring contaminants are most often Manganite, Manganese(II) oxide, which gives the Umbers their dark colored masstones. The non-coloring contaminants are most often natural extenders used in industry as industrial fillers, including Baryte, Talcum, and Calcium carbonates.

“The History of Iron Oxides, Known as Earth Colors”:

Natural iron oxides have been found in many parts of the earth in soft shades of red, orange, yellow and green, more commonly called “earth” colors. Natural iron oxides have been on artists’ palettes for more than 40,000 years!!! The cave paintings, still visible today, are an evidence to the strength and stability of these nice mineral colorants. These muted yellow, orange, red and brown colors dominated the work of the old masters because earth colors were not only lightfast, but were frequently available. The range of colored earth is obtained from the nature of iron oxide that is present in the material. Limonite ranges from yellow to brown and contains water in its chemical composition (hydrous ferric oxide). Artists know these as Ochre, Sienna, and Umber. Ochre is clay-colored with hydrated iron oxide. The famous “Terra di Siena” is a hydrated iron oxide from Tuscany. It contains silicates and aluminates that increase the transparency of the pigment. When limonite is heated through calcination, the water content is eliminated, resulting in the red hematite known as “Burnt Sienna.” Red earth colors, either natural red oxides or red hematite from roasting, have been used for funerary purposes throughout history because of their close association with human blood. Umber is found in sites where naturally occurring manganese dioxide combines with iron. Umbers and other pigments containing manganese make quick-drying oil colors. Historically, artists and painters pushed against the limitations of their colors. Sienna and Umber are key colors in creating effects of depth with its almost imperceptible transitions from light to dark.